Black Saturday and the 2009 Victorian Bushfires

Various publications and presentations relating to Black Saturday and the 2009 Victorian Bushfires

H1N1 2009 Influenza

Various publications and presentations relating to H1N1 2009 influenza outbreak

In the media

Latest interviews and articles from the media

Invited Speaker

Various presentations given as an invited and keynote speaker.

Mass Gathering Health

Various publications and presentations relating to Mass Gathering and Major Event health

21 July, 2014

National consistency in industrial awards for disaster release for Australian Nurses: An integrative review of enterprise agrrangements



Free full-text article is available here (PDF)

ABSTRACT
This research explores the types of provisions made available to nurses within Australian public employment agreements to respond to disasters and alternate provisions made available to provide personal property protection and personal care during a disaster. An integrative literature review methodology is used to collect, evaluate, analyse and integrate sources of evidence to inform a discussion on the current enterprise arrangements for nurses with respect to eight Australian jurisdictions. These were evaluated for the industrial provisions made available to nurses wanting to assist in responding to disasters. Only five of these agreements mentioned provisions for nurses to assist in disasters. Where these provisions exist, they vary in their consistency, terminology and the quantity of the entitlements, potentially leading to inequality and variability in the financial support frameworks for nurses involved in disaster events.



Lenson S, Ranse J, Cusack L. (2014). National consistency in industrial awards for disaster release for Australian nurses: An integrative review of enterprise arrangements. Asia Pacific Journal of Health Management. 9(2):53-58.

30 June, 2014

Doing phenomenology and hermeneutics: Australian civilian nurses' lived experience of being in a disasters


This presentation was presented at the Higher Degrees Week - Flinders University, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Nursing and Midwifery as a progress seminar for my PhD studies.

ABSTRACT
This presentation will focus on the theoretical underpinnings of phenomenology and hermeneutics as they are applied to a research paradigm which aims to: provide insight into the experience of being an Australian civilian nurse within the out-of-hospital environment during a disaster. A purposive sampling technique was employed to recruit participants for this research. Subsequently, data was collected from eight participants using semi-structured interviews at two points in time, one week apart. The first interview was primarily phenomenological, whilst the second was more hermeneutic in nature. Participant narrative was captured on an electronic audio recording device and transcribed. In terms of data analysis, phenomenology is neither inductive nor deductive, rather phenomenology is reductive. This research primarily used an eidetic reduction of participant narrative, returning to the experience as it is in itself; by uncover the uniqueness or ‘whatness’ of the experience. The result of the reduction is a lived experience description, a description of the experience that is recognisable by others of what it may be like being an Australian civilian nurse within the out-of-hospital environment during a disaster.




Ranse J. (2014). Doing phenomenology and hermeneutics: Australian civilian nurses' lived experience of being in a disasters; presentation at the Higher Degrees Week - Flinders University, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Nursing and Midwifery. Adelaide, South Australia, 30th June.

05 June, 2014

Disasters happen: the realities of being in a disaster


I was invited to the University of New England, Armidale, New South Wales to present on the topic of disaster health and to participate in some research collaboration with academic staff members.

ABSTRACT:
Disasters happen, and health professionals are involved in restoring and maintaining the health and health services of disaster-affected communities. This presentation will provide an overview of what is known about disaster health in the Australian context, such as the willingness of health professionals to assist in a disaster and their educational preparedness. In particular, this presentation will focus on the realities of what it is like to be a health professional in a disaster.





Ranse J. (2014). Disasters happen: the realities of being in a disaster; presentation to Faculty at University of New England, Armidale, NSW, 5th June.

28 May, 2014

Enhancing the minimum data set for mass-gathering research and evaluation: An integrative literature review


Free full-text article is available here (PDF)

ABSTRACT:
Introduction: In 2012, a minimum data set (MDS) was proposed to enable the standardized collection of biomedical data across various mass gatherings. However, the existing 2012 MDS could be enhanced to allow for its uptake and usability in the international context. The 2012 MDS is arguably Australian-centric and not substantially informed by the literature. As such, an MDS with contributions from the literature and application in the international settings is required.

Methods: This research used an integrative literature review design. Manuscripts were collected using keyword searches from databases and journal content pages from 2003 through 2013. Data were analyzed and categorized using the existing 2012 MDS as a framework.

Results: In total, 19 manuscripts were identified that met the inclusion criteria. Variation in the patient presentation types was described in the literature from the mass-gathering papers reviewed. Patient presentation types identified in the literature review were compared to the 2012 MDS. As a result, 16 high-level patient presentation types were identified that were not included in the 2012 MDS.

Conclusion: Adding patient presentation types to the 2012 MDS ensures that the collection of biomedical data for mass-gathering health research and evaluation remains contemporary and comprehensive. This review proposes the addition of 16 high-level patient presentation categories to the 2012 MDS in the following broad areas: gastrointestinal, obstetrics and gynecology, minor illness, mental health, and patient outcomes. Additionally, a section for self-treatment has been added, which was previously not included in the 2012 MDS, but was widely reported in the literature.


Ranse J, Hutton A, Turris S, Lund A. (2014). Enhancing the minimum data set for mass gathering research and evaluation: An integrative literature review. Prehospital Disaster Medicine. 29(3):1-10.


13 May, 2014

What was the role of nurses during the 2011 Great East Earthquake of Japan? An integrative review of the Japanese literature


Free full-text article is available here (PDF)

ABSTRACT

Background: An earthquake and tsunami hit the east coast of Japan on March 11, 2011. Nurses were actively involved in the health response to this disaster and, subsequently, many authors have reported on the role nurses played in these efforts in Japanese nursing professional journals.

Aim: To describe the role of nurses who assisted in the 2011 Great East Earthquake of Japan by reviewing Japanese literature and reporting the findings in English.

Method: This research used an integrative literature review methodology. Manuscripts were obtained from the Japanese database Ichushi Ver. 5 (Japan Medical Abstracts Society, Tokyo, Japan). A total of 44 manuscripts were identified and included in a thematic analysis.

Results: Three main themes were identified: (1) nursing roles, (2) specialized nursing roles, and (3) preparedness education. Nurses fulfilled different roles in the period after the disaster (ie, as a clinician, a communicator, a leader, and a provider of psychosocial support). Additionally, the specialized nurse role was identified, along with the need for preparedness education to support the nurse’s role in a disaster.

Conclusion: The understanding of the role of nurses in disasters is expanding. There is a need to further explore the roles of specialized nurses in disasters. Further disaster education opportunities should be available as a part of continuing education for all nurses. Radiation aspects of disaster assistance should be included in disaster education programs where there are radio-nuclear hazards present in the environment

Kako M, Ranse J, Yamamoto A, Arbon P. (2014). What was the role of nurses during the 2011 Great East Earthquake of Japan? An integrative review of the Japanese literature. Prehospital Disaster Medicine. 29(3):1-5.

09 May, 2014

Operational aspects of health care delivery at World Youth Day 2008: Lessons learnt by an emergency management organisation


Free full-text article is available from the Australasian Journal of Paramedicine


SUMMARY

Hundreds of thousands of people attended World Youth Day 2008 [WYD08] in Sydney. Pilgrims from over 170 nations attended the week-long event (15-20th July) culminating in one of the largest mass gatherings in Australia. St John Ambulance Australia was the primary health care agency chosen for the provision of health services to WYD08 participants and officials. WYD08 posed a number of challenges during the planning and deployment stages of operational activities; due to the extremely large number of participants and varying location of WYD08 events. This article provides an overview of WYD08, the involvement of an emergency management organisation with a focus on their experiences and lessons learnt. These experiences and lessons are useful for any health care agency or emergency management organisation, tasked with planning similar large-scale mass gathering events.


Moutia D, Ranse J, Banu-Lawrence H. Operational aspects of health delivery at World Youth Day 2008: Lesions learnt by an emergency management organisation. Australasian Journal of Paramedicine. 2014;11(3):[accepted]



29 April, 2014

Understanding patient presentations among young people at mass gatherings









Ranse J. (2014). Understanding patient presentations among young people at mass gatherings; presentation to Paramedics Australasia, Paramedics Australasia Student Association and St John Ambulance (ACT), Canberra, ACT, 29th April.

24 February, 2014

Understanding the characteristics of patient presentations of young people at outdoor music festivals


Free full-text article is available here (PDF)

ABSTRACT 

Outdoor music festivals are unique events given that they are, for the most part, bounded and ticketed, and alcohol is served. They frequently have a higher incidence of patient presentations when compared with similar types of mass gatherings. Often, however, single events are reported in the literature, making it difficult to generalize the findings across multiple events and limiting the understanding of the ‘‘typical’’ patient presentations at these mass gatherings. The aim of this paper was to understand the characteristics of young people who have presented as patients to on-site health care at outdoor music festivals in Australia, and the relative proportion and type of injury and illness presentations at these events. This research used a nonexperimental design, utilizing a retrospective review of patient report forms from outdoor music festivals. Data were collected from 26 outdoor music festivals across four States of Australia during the year 2010. Females presented at greater numbers than males, and over two-thirds presented with minor illnesses, such as headaches. Males presented with injuries, in particular lacerations to their face and their hands, and alcohol and substance use made up 15% of all presentations.



Hutton A, Ranse J, Verdonk N, Ullah S, Arbon P. Understanding the characteristics of patient presentations of young people at outdoor music festivals. Prehospital Disaster Medicine. 2014;29(2):1-7.

01 February, 2014

Nurses and Twitter: The good, the bad and the reluctant



Free full-text article is available here (PDF)

ABSTRACT
Nurses and other health professionals are adopting social media to network with health care professionals and organizations, support health education, deliver health promotion messages, enhance professional development and employment opportunities, and communicate within political forums. This paper explores the growing use of social media, and examines the current dynamics of Twitter as an example of the uptake of social media. This paper also offers practical guidance for new Twitter users who are interested in using this social media approach in clinical or educational settings, and for professional development.



Wilson RL, Ranse J, Cashin A, McNamara P. (2014). Nurses and Twitter: The good, the bad, and the reluctant. Collegian. 21(2):111-119.

16 December, 2013

The role of Australian nurses in disasters: what ‘group’ of nurses should assist?


Free full-text article is available here (PDF)

OVERVIEW
This publication builds on the understanding of the Australian nurses role in a disaster. In particular it focuses on research conducted following the Black Saturday and Victorian Bushfires of 2009. It highlights the need for nurses from multiple disciplines to assist following a disaster.


Ranse J. (2013). The role of Australian nurses in disasters: what ‘group’ of nurses should assist? The Hive [Australian College of Nursing – newsletter publication]. (4):24-25

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